Weekly Ramble #46

There is no shame in having anxiety. We should never beat ourselves up for what is essentially a reaction or a feeling to something. Like a suspension bridge the cables and struts of it’s anatomy only have a certain tolerance, own own cables and struts (emotions) are under the same stress.

It’s a natural normal thing to feel anxious and the triggers can spring up from anywhere. That big presentation, a speech, an important game and even getting on that plane (for me). Rationalization is hard thing to find in the murk and dark of anxiety, every little thing becomes heightened. It can be hell for sometimes days before and then the actual experience may turn out to have all been in our heads (but even after I still hate flying).

We can debilitate ourselves with thoughts alone, and maybe we were being silly in that moment, but that’s not tackling the issue, that’s just a dismissal. In this day and age especially we must talk about our emotions, they lead us through that murk. Depression, anxiety, nervousness, worry, they are all considered as bad feelings, but they are normal reactions to the life we live. It’s okay to have these feelings, sometimes every day.

The next time you lift something heavy or god forbid do a plank, your arms or abdominal muscles begin to shake, that’s because they are working and again that is something normal like emotion.

In a world where all of us strife to be different we all have one thing that is the same, our emotions, so let’s bloody talk about them more!  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Time to change, the word we use…

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I have discussed the subject of time to change before here on the Hall of information. For those who don’t know, time to change is a program to challenge mental health discrimination and stigma towards it.

To me ‘mental’ is actually quite a harsh word to use when describing someone’s health. If we are moving forward with talking about this stuff don’t you think it got a better name?

In fact if you say the word ‘mental’ enough it seems like quite a nasty and horrible thing to say. So why hasn’t anybody really challenged that? I know right now many organisations who work towards and for people with such health problems use that word quite a lot. Would it be that hard to change it to psychological health?

People with the most minor of leg or joint problems aren’t categorised as an amputee so why does that one word govern all of those who suffer with psychological problems.

Changing mental health to psychological health seems more logical to me seeing as a person would go to a psychologist for help with any problems regarding the human mind.

The word mental doesn’t offend me deep down but still it could be replaced. Especially in the world we live in now with political correctness don’t you think this subject should come into the 21st century?

As quoted in my previous post ‘No matter what anybody tells you, words and ideas can change the world.’

Although this quote came from a film it still has the right sentiment. Together people like me who don’t currently suffer from any psychological health problems and people that do have to band together and start talking about this. Wherever you look in history when people have worked together they have achieved incredible things, even if it is just changing one word. Together we can change to world one word at a time.

My good friend Matt Streuli has recently written some stuff about his experiences as he suffers from some psychological health issues. He wrote for the Huffington post and has even been on the radio, check out his story it’s well worth a read. All Matt has done is talk about it and that’s all anyone needs to do.

What’s your story? Would you join a campaign to decommission the word ‘mental’ as way of describing health?

This is the internet after all so you must have an opinion. Get in touch

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