‘Lords of Mars’ by Colin Yeoman – Review

Gripping high end space fiction about the politics of humanity, civilisation and revolution…

Lords of Mars is a story that embodies the many aspects of human politics from power, revolution, deception, change and no matter what civilisation we create, these things will always exist wherever we go. Perhaps the greatest threat to our own civilisation and history is ourselves as a species. These themes and concepts are then combined with the question of where we originated from and how we actually got here on this planet.

While the first book in this Custodian Library Archives series merely considers the question, Colin Yeoman uses this story to answer it and there is a lot more going on throughout this fantastic well paced read. This book could even be enjoyed on a stand alone level simply for it’s originality.

We are taken way back to when humans were leaving the near fallen civilisations of Mars; although some feel as if they were abandoning their fellow man but there is a new planet on the horizon. This is a polarising subject that creates opposing factions who feel like their history and people are being left behind. The preservation of this history is being contended here.

Much of the story takes place during the crossing between the two planets on board the ‘Spero’ where a multitude of characters are either for or against the new frontier. We meet ‘Cal’ who looks to lead a revolution in securing the ‘Remnants’ history and survival, that is after he encounters a stowaway who might know a little too much about the future. Of course there are other physical struggles like adjusting to the gravity of space travel and then the new world. ‘Centrifugal Gravity’ is just one of the many cool concepts this book is full of.

The pace quickens in the final chapters with action, deception and page turning thrills that highlight the early days of when we first arrived to the new world all of which is left open for more. Readers of science fiction will enjoy the original world building and thought provoking nature of what is a great read.

5 Stars – Thoroughly enjoyable and great escapism!

‘Senescence’ by Denver Scott – Review

One giant leap into the future of humankind via the cosmos through the vessel of science that makes for a fascinating read!

SENESCENCE by [DENVER SCOTT]

Denver Scott delivers a deep dive look into the future of human life where the line between science and fiction merge flawlessly. The science element takes centre stage and carries the presence of a main character consistently throughout what is a truly fascinating read.

Senescence covers a lot of ground (or space) and initially focuses on a futuristic world of extremes in both medical advances and the potential threats there are to humanity. From the eventual hazards of ‘space junk’, eradicating illness and even the future of genetics, all of the directions this book takes a reader on come from mostly real scenarios that are backed up with science which is then extended further – it’s a unique concept and style that keeps the story moving while also proving that the author’s imagination and knowledge go hand in hand. Creativity meets realism with terminology that’s both new and familiar such as ‘Histolog’ and ‘VIP’ – Vitally Improved Persona, none of which feel like fiction at all.

Much of each chapter is made up of an explanation or story that surrounds the subject matter in what is an unlimited guided tour into the future where attention to detail is at the very forefront. We meet characters who are on that journey much like us. Commander Jenna Morton is a genetically perfected human creation and along with her crew are on a pioneering voyage of discovery. It is on that voyage that we experience these wide range of subjects from our own planet’s nature/history to it’s future along with humankind, civilisations, terraforming planets, deep space travel and even time travel.

Even though I am more on the layman level of understanding, not once did I feel out of my depth as the writing style is accessible to any reader of the curious persuasion, especially those interested in the cosmos. This is a book that celebrates humankind and science that will stir your imagination while also being informative.

5 Stars – Fantastic Read. Review first premiered via Reedsy Discovery 

Memories of Mars: a Novella (Custodian Library Archives Book 1) by Colin Yeoman – Review

A thought provokingly original novella that will leave you wanting more…

 

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There aren’t many stories that successfully combine real science with imaginative fiction which is not only clever but also thought provokingly original, Memories of Mars is both of those and so much more.

From what is a relatively slow but curious start moves towards an imaginative theory about the origins of man and the history of the red planet known as Mars. That is after main character ‘Josiah Lamples’ discovers evidence of life on the barren surface and is soon ‘let go’ by his employers. This is where the story becomes engaging and interesting with just a hint of deception, we see ‘Josiah’ come face to face with the rabbit hole of theory and that life long question of what happened to Mars?

Colin Yeoman has cleverly fused real elements of biological transmission experimentation with the human memory which possibly fills in the gaps of our history in the universe and more specifically Mars which is wholeheartedly original.

Readers of both science fiction and literary fiction will enjoy this brand of ‘Fringe Fiction’ that gives answers and leaves you wanting more..

4 Stars – A very interesting and original read. Novellas like this don’t get enough credit. Reviews left via Goodreads and Amazon UK

 

 

Publication Day! Darke Blood out now!

The day is finally here! My second book Darke Blood is officially out now! The selfies already started earlier this week after I kicked off proceedings on Instagram where I can happily say we have already broke records with the amount of likes it recieved.

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That many likes for something without a cat, food or cleavage…

And that is all I want out of this book, growth and evolution. A few more sales and few more likes than last time will make me a happy independently published author.   Above all more reviews on Amazon and hopefully Goodreads will grant this project a success, so please if you read my work leave a review!

I must take this opportunity to thank everyone for their support towards Darke Blood, this was indeed the hardest story I have ever struggled to tell and seeing the whole thing come together with your support has been fantastic. Being a two time author makes this all seem like I am more than just a lucky one off guy who published one book, plus it gives readers a back catalogue to delve into if they like my work.

If you like Darke Blood and survive the ride,  the twists and the turns then I guarantee you will be a reader of my stuff for years to come. This one really tests the boundaries for the reader as well as tell an atmospheric psychological story of redemption and identity. And yeah there are vampires, witches and some connections to Open Evening!

This hasn’t been a sole effort and I must thank my editor and publisher Nicky from Satin Publishing for helping me so much develop this story into what was an initial draft all the way to polished published book. Darke Blood went through many minor and major changes throughout the drafting and editing process. My next thank you goes to Design for Writers , they simply gave this book an identity by creating a fantastic looking cover. I was really stumped as to what I wanted this one to look like so Design for Writers saved me in that sense and the outcome is a world class looking cover.

All there is left for to say is thank you everyone, I have achieved my dream once again and now it’s over to you to help me find some success with it. Let’s start a new selfie movement with Darke Blood and remember your shares, likes and comments are what generates buzz about this, and will ultimately decide its success!

Happy publication Day!

And heres the direct link to the book…

Science up close: My experience

I don’t talk much about what I do between the hours of my average weekday, mostly because I am not really into mixing work life with personal. But over the weekend and for the first time in around 15 years my place of work opened its doors for the general public.

Now if you work in retail that isn’t so special but where I work is the very forefront of cutting edge science.

Science up close was an event that took place at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in Oxfordshire this past Saturday. This was my first real experience, like many, of dealing with members of the public, who I can say were thankfully enthusiastic and wanted to listen to what I had to say. With anything that is half the battle, whether you are selling a book, or performing on stage, if the audience don’t want to be there, well the struggle is real.

To me this was a first because wherever I have tried to engage large numbers of people to gain their interest, it has been me trying to interest them. But before the doors opened these enthusiastic and somewhat curious group wanted to be there. Curiosity and questions is the very pinnacle of what science is. Finding the answer is sometimes the outcome.

Throughout the laboratory site there were many displays happening, mine in particular consisted of a high voltage electronic area within the central laser facility. This particular area known as the Vulcan Capacitor Bank (yes Vulcan, but there wasn’t a captain Kirk in sight, honest), powered the Vulcan laser. Now this laser is damn powerful and one of a kind. In fact so powerful, it’s unit of measurement is in Petawatts (1015 Watts).

So the capacitor bank works by charging up high levels of electricity and then discharging them through a flash lamp which in effect amplifies the Guinness world record holding laser.

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A flash lamp in operation

It’s surprising how much you know that the general public will find interesting. This is an area which I spend my work time, carrying out repairs and thinking of not much else. Whereas the public and even staff set their eyes upon this set up for the first time and looked in awe.

The range of people visiting consisted of young kids who were interested in visual science to older fellows who had worked with electronics or science in their lifetime.

Overall my experience with the public visiting my place of work was a positive one. Early reports are suggesting the whole day went really well and around 15,000 people came to the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory.

It’s important that we have days like this, to inspire the future scientists who will equip us for this ever changing world.

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Me at work in the Vulcan capacitor bank (blue cases are the caps) this area was open to the public