The General Election : Britain can certainly moan

From glancing ever so briefly at social media over my weekend it’s safe to say people are rather unhappy with the outcome of the very recent UK General election. In fact I couldn’t name one person I know that is genuinely satisfied with the result.

Did people actually get what they wanted?

Is that the state of modern politics? People are somewhat becoming used to getting something else as opposed to what or who they voted for. Instead of vent and rant with an opinionated spat on the internet, I would rather look at little deeper as to why there’s some grumpiness right now.

The disgruntled are in simple terms reacting which is an effect. Writing 101 states that every cause has an effect so what is that cause?

all parties 1) The SNP Revolt

I sat next to my good (partially drunk on Asti) friend Matt Streuli as the election results came in at the rather wee hours of Friday morning. The theme at that time was SNP taking seats from Labour. Rather quickly a Scottish revolution became apparent. We even saw history right there, the youngest ever MP aged 20 had been voted in.

Now without voting numbers and proportions aside, the Scottish folk are obviously looking for change, with the referendum theme still fresh they looked for this change through Nicola Sturgeon and the SNP. She wanted to get the Tories out and said this more than once during the debates (remember that, it’s important further down). She even offered to collaborate with Labour to do this, but was there any other choice?

2)  No coalition is better than a coalition

Down south most of the voting public were thinking either red or blue. We knew that team yellow proved to be irrelevant to Downing Street this time around. Ed Miliband of labour didn’t spend the last 5 years as prime minister, David Cameron did (elected or not).

 The devil you know?

The exit polls suggested this early on. But voting an all conservative government in is just an effect of the SNP wanting to get the Tories out. How would they do that, by teaming up with the only other party as big as conservative, Labour.

Again we are seeing people use their vote for a different agenda.  Think about it carefully for just a moment. Conservative got in because people didn’t want another coalition of two parties who hadn’t seen Downing street recently. It really is a case of the devil you know but this time there is no conscience of Nick Clegg on Cameron’s shoulder.

The minority of Scotland posed a threat to the majority and led to the election of David Cameron.

Conclusion 

That’s how I see it anyway, and even after looking at the first past the post rules and proportions. UKIP had a good day in terms of votes but were marooned by these rules.

It will be an interesting 5 years, seeing what Scotland will do, of course the deficit and borrowing. Will they put the rubbish of the deficit into just another bin called borrowing? Food banks, an issue that is ever increasing, how many will we see in 5 years?

There are some things that you can’t blame the past 5 years for. Our interest rate is rock bottom, but the world economy is still recovering. For me it will be interesting as in the recent budget they promised more control over the science and research budgets.

I am optimistic for now, but then again nothing ever works out how you expect it to.

 

political map

polls

 

 

There was another debate…

Last night was yet another date on the election campaign debate tour and I have to say it was rather enjoyable. Good on ya BBC, you put on a decent show (I will ignore the 70’s for now). Talking of shows there were two no shows. The current leaders of Britain Nick Clegg and David Cameron were both absent. Damn did they miss out the action.

In fact the two words Nick Clegg weren’t mentioned once. Does that suggest the liberal democrats are now a lost cause?

So here we saw the five potential downing street parties go head to head about issues in forms of questions raised by the audience. The leaders all introduced themselves and the audience slowly came out of their shells to applaud some of them.

Already I liked this debate more than the 7 way a few weeks prior. There just seemed to be a better energy about things. One common theme of slamming David Cameron indicated that he had been badly advised not to be there. Nicola Sturgeon of the Scottish national party even suggested a coalition with Ed Miliband’s labour party just to get the conservatives out.

Nigel Farage came across strong and with relevant points but half an hour in he weirdly insulted the BBC audience. He is quoted to say “This is a remarkable audience even by the left wing standards of the BBC.” We would then see the other candidates lay into Farage somewhat defeating him. Of course the pantomime style booing ensued. Although nearer the end he did get some applause. I will give it to the man, he can talk but is the controversy of UKIP really him?

Ed Miliband did his usual talking to the camera and people at home instead the audience. Although it’s kinda cheesy it does work. Yet again he talked about previous labour getting it wrong, and getting money from a mansion tax.

Leanne Wood from Plaid Cymru (Welsh party) came across likable, but are the needs of Wales the needs of the UK? Her best moment and maybe of the whole debate came from her comment to Nigel Farage about disagreeing with her opponent on the far right (boom boom).

Natalie Bennet of the Green party heavily opposed any type of nuclear weapons when asked about trident. (Cough cough, tell that to the other countries that have nuclear capabilities)

Well I think I have said something about every candidate.

From this debate and with 20 days until voting, I now know who I will be voting for. I t could be 1 of 7 or is it 1 of 5. Either way if you are of voting age in the UK, this BBC debate is definitely worth looking at.

 

ladies man

Ladies man

 

 

UKIP: Controversy Creates Votes?

 

uk

We all know that controversy creates cash. But does it get votes? The 2015 general election is quickly approaching and so my main focus this week is UKIP.

Yes the UK independence party. No matter where you stand in British politics you have an opinion about Nigel Farage and his team. I will even admit before the turn of this decade I voted for them, but before the angry mob congregates outside stately Hall manor let me explain.

Before their rise in popularity quite recently, UKIP had this thing about keeping our currency what it is. They were heavily opposed to the Euro and that is my reason for voting. In hindsight I chose wisely but the UK kept the Pound anyway (and boy look how that turned out on the mainland). So pitchforks and torches away, for now.

mob

Gotta love a decent angry mob

But for much of the country there is a rather strong divide. Some will support UKIP and others will absolutely hate them. Constantly there are headlines in the news, only yesterday was Nigel Farage apparently driven out of a pub by an angry mob of protesters (I can’t vouch how true that is). But never the less his party are in the news, again.

Some will even say UKIP are racists and that they are anti-immigration. They want to tighten the borders and make Britain great again.

The way I see it is more open minded to them. I still don’t know who I will be voting for come May but much like any country there are people from other places here. Britain is a country of a thousand cultures and nothing short of breaking human rights will change that. It’s too far gone and that isn’t a negative. Because these people come this country to work, to pay tax and contribute to society.

Does UKIP want to stop that?

There are many places in the UK where the people desperately want change. Many run down coastal towns that were once predominantly British are an example. Farage is running for Thanet, a coastal constituency. But now these places are feeling the squeeze of this country as a whole changing. If you don’t want your town to keep up with the times then it will only decay further.

Right now, unless any other UKIP parliamentary candidates get removed, will make some ground this coming election. But there aren’t enough run down coastal towns in the UK for them to get into Downing street. But I could be wrong,  I have been before.

This election is the hardest to call, ever. That’s because parties like UKIP are coming out into the spotlight. Unlike labour, conservative and liberal, UKIP are pretty bad at handling image (I might think twice about liberal). They are a young party compared. Time will tell whether or not Nigel’s controversy gang will surpass anything more than a daily mail web edition headline.

What do you think? Personally I know for sure I won’t be voting UKIP, but do you feel different? There are some people who are worried about UKIP, are you one of them?

(Keep it nice and friendly. Any angry or behaviour I deem unacceptable won’t be tolerated and your views won’t be published here, yes the Hall of information can be a dictatorship if need be)

You can hear my opinions in more detail in a podcast known as off the radar, go check out our latest series.

farage

Before he realized the angry mob was coming his way!