Immortal Billionaire by Sarah Jayne Harry – Review

A romance story with a unique premise…

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At the initial stages of this book it would appear the premise is a little absurd but stories like this are supposed to be and the more you lean into it, the more enjoyable and unique it becomes. What starts out as quite a heavy subject actually turns into something quite the opposite for ‘Sophia Larkson’ who is a typical older teen with attitude and character. It is revealed she has been sold to a billionaire by her father who is in debt. As the main narrator of the story she confides in the reader as everything unfolds which works most of the time even but on occasion it can interrupt the flow. 

‘Aiden Livingston’ our billionaire in question spends some of the time taking over narration duty and we see elements of his backstory some of which was cleverly done but other parts felt less detailed. I would have preferred to be shown a little more of his ‘darker elements’ side and origins as opposed to being told. Being a man with so much money and with a history of loss ‘Aiden’ faces great difficulty in finding genuine love – a dilemma which he looks to solve and hence the story unfolds.

Sarah Jayne Harry has combined elements of many different genres into what could be a sophisticated fairy tale of sorts but suited for older teens and above. Depending on how you look at it, this could be Stockholm syndrome or a story that tributes elements of Beauty and the Beast but either way there is never a dull moment. The main characters are believable and the whole experience I enjoyed.

4 Stars 

Lost in a Quatrain: Poetry Anthology by Adiela Akoo – Review

An interesting, thoughtful and meaningful array of great poetry…

lost in a quatrianLost in Quatrain is wonderful collection of poetry that covers a vast range of theme and subject matter from race, culture, political and faith with pretty much everything in between.

Through the many poems; all of which range in length and structure the reader is taken on a journey that resonates the sometimes poignant or meaningful recollections and thoughts of Adiela Akoo. Many of them are short but still carry a powerful message while others are longer, from a few lines all the way to a few pages there is pretty much everything a poem should be in this book.

‘Coupling’ is definitely a poem I could relate to as a creative and of course I have to mention ‘Whiplash’ for it’s unique structure. I found the humour in ‘Drunken Man’ along with a great appreciation for ‘Race with the Wind’ amongst many others

For anyone who is a fan of poetry or has an open mind to it I highly recommend this book.

5 Stars – Disclaimer: I was provided with a free e-copy of this title in exchange for a review, thank you to the author for providing that copy!  

Haunted Ends by Elizabeth Price – Review

A fun quirky tale of the paranormal with mystery and intrigue…

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Haunted Ends is part ghost story and part murder mystery which turned out to be an overall fun read. The story opens with ‘Sam’ who is short in stature but full of character. His journey makes for one of two main plot lines that eventually intertwine after the initial chapters; the other follows ‘Rocky’ a car fanatic and paranormal investigator that used to be able to see ghosts, this is an ability that returns to him and he decides to use it which makes the story.

Eventually we see ‘Sam’ and ‘Rocky’s’ paths cross in a ghost buddy story situation seeing them team up to solve a murder shrouded in mystery and deception. Rocky’s journey seems to be full of misfortune while ‘Sam’ is doing his best to adapt to his new existence.

Elizabeth Price has created a world where ghosts are characters too and not just some scary concept making it accessible to most readers; it’s quirky in places but still believable throughout.

As the story came to it’s final chapters everything was wrapped up nicely (although quite quickly) making for a good paranormal read that’s different, imaginative and fun.

4 Stars 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chilling Book Recommendations for Halloween… part 1

Halloween is just around the corner and considering horror is probably my favorite genre in both cinema and reading here are some chilling books I’ve read over the past year which I recommend…

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“Something happened tonight, I don’t know what. Something that ripped the veil between the Chicago of the living and the Chicago of the dead…” 

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‘Undertown: A Novella’ by K.Noel Moore is a chilling and clever fusing of history intertwined with real events set around the historic crime wave/prohibition era of 1930’s America.

I found myself reading this novella in one sitting within a few enjoyable hours. There are plenty of references and terms used in the narrative which are authentic to the historic era with a handy reference/definition section placed at the end of the book (something I felt was a nice touch and shows the author has put in a large amount of care, research and thought into).

Overall Undertown is a perfectly paced, easily readable and well written history novella with just the right amount of chills and atmosphere to make it stand out.

 

‘In space, not all things were certain… not even death’

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Next up is ‘Demonspawn’ by Christina Engela which is a sci-fi horror space story with psychological mystery and suspense throughout. The somewhat damned crew of the I.S.S. Mordrake; a ship seemingly stranded and damaged beyond repair in the furthest reaches of space then stumbles upon another ship, derelict and just floating there…

The story reminded me of films such as Alien and Event Horizon but Demonspawn could easily stand shoulder to shoulder with them. There were many concepts of the sci-fi genre in this book that were original and put together in a way not seen before anywhere else. You can grab yourself a copy here.

 

‘A slow burning tale that twists into the deep shadowy darkness of the unexpected…’

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In Blood of the Sixth’ by K.R Rowe  there’s a lot going on under the surface of a story which sits within the realms of gritty urban horror, mystery and witchcraft.

Blood of the Sixth has a complex interwoven plot which is delivered in a way that makes it an easy to follow read; something I imagine the author has worked tremendously hard to achieve. The whole layout of the book from short sharp chapter length, to characters all the way to general story has been well thought out.

For some parts of my reading experience I genuinely laughed and others I found to be quite harrowing (again in a good way) as there were some real graphic violent portions all of which fitted well for the genres. The use of description in some instances has been painstakingly constructed and again the hard work by K. R. Rowe is obvious to see so trust me when I say this book is good!

‘A modern vampire story that takes the reader on a journey of twists and turns…’

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There are only a handful of authors out there who are keeping the vampire genre alive and one of them is Villimey Mist who presents ‘Nocturnal Blood’ a story than convinced me throughout the duration of my reading experience that it truly is a great addition to the genre!

I found Nocturnal Blood to be a highly readable tale of bravery, friendship, character development and vampires; a genre in modern times that doesn’t get nearly enough credit especially when stories like this exist. Its also an important story in a sense that the M.C suffers from anxiety and O.C.D which is a brave thing for an author to write about!

The sequel is coming very soon so now would be a perfect time to grab yourself a copy!

 

“There are more than shadows lurking in the darkness of those trees.”

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Wait what? Your plugging your own book in this thing? My answer to you is fu** yeah and why not! Keeping with the theme of vampire stories here’s mine. ‘Darke Blood’ is a story that reviewers have convinced me is worth reading – I personally thought for quite some time it wasn’t that great but some awesome people have left some awesome reviews for a story I literally had to find my inner author to finish writing it! The journey is turning out to be worth it in the end and the sequel is coming next year!

Here’s a recent review by Blair from the awesome Feed the Crime blog… 

And with that self promo I have no shame in this is the end of part 1, stay tuned next week for part 2! 

Have you got a chilling book rec? Drop it in the comments because here at the Hall of information we are always looking for more book reads!

Reviewing The Teleporter by Kurt Brindley

I raise my glass to fellow author and friend Kurt Brindley for his awesome review of the Teleporter.

Check out what he had to say below!

I urge you check out Kurt’s most recent release ‘The Good Kill’ which I reviewed a short while back; it’s an enthralling, gripping tale of epic proportions taking the reader on a ride full of twists, turns and action… so trust me, it’s good!

Buy it here!  Go now!

 

BOOK | FICTION | HUMOR THE TELEPORTER LEE HALL RATING: ★ ★ ★ ★ What if there was a power like no other? What if one drunken slouch happened to stumble where nobody has stumbled before and discovered the ability to teleport!Just when you thought there were enough super hero stories in this world, we made another one…Kurt […]

via THE TELEPORTER by Lee Hall – A Review — KURTBRINDLEY.COM

-|Reviewing… The Teleporter by Lee Hall |- — Feed The Crime

A huge tip of the cap and a thank you to Blair from Feed the Crime for reviewing the Teleporter! Check out the full review by clicking on the thing below and remember to support and follow awesome book bloggers like this!

If you are interested in reading the Teleporter I would be more than happy to send you the e version in exchange for a review…


So, today I’m reviewing The Teleporter by Lee Hall, this is the second book I’ve read by him, I reviewed Darke Blood back in April, you can find it here. I did receive this copy from Lee for me to review, however, I think you know by now that I’m always honest, even if I […]

via -|Reviewing… The Teleporter by Lee Hall |- — Feed The Crime

Dead Man’s Hammer by Christina Engela – Review

Suspense, drama and modern issues all of which are tackled in a fun but important way…

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As the Quantum series unfolds, it grows more and more impressive. Dead Man’s Hammer is proof that Christina Engela can build an established world and insert so many genres into it along with retaining a unique style of writing that not only tributes her influences but has a way of confiding in readers. We are back on the quirky planet of ‘Deanna’ home of the rather ominous sounding ‘Obsidian crows’ and more specifically ‘Atro city’ a place this time around we get to know a bit better while referencing the previous stories of the ‘Quantum series’.

Someone is targeting my favourite characters; an assassin enigmatically named ‘Villainessa Tittel’ who is after one person in particular and series regular; Cindy Mei Winter. ‘Villainessa’ proves to be quite a force in her field of work and does everything in her power to draw in ‘Mei’ whom share an interesting history. It is in this history where readers will find the true message and meaning of the story. While ‘Mei’ has moved forward in life she must face what is essentially a demon of her past and a life before she became ‘Cindy’ and it’s trying to torment her. This is a massive nod to modern issues that many people face in the transgender community and in life as a whole, sometimes it isn’t about who you were, but what you are now and what you truly feel. This concept is galvanised by another character ‘Danielle Grauffis’ who is in a process of transition in her young life compared to ‘Mei’. 

Of course other returning regulars such as ‘Beck the Badfella’ – who we get a name origins story from and special branch ‘Fred’ the arborian make appearances along with an extended appearance from ‘Sheriff Peggy Ann Muller’ who makes quite a team with ‘Mei’ and this is where a crime mystery element of the story truly shines.

Suspense, drama and even tragedy are ways that I would describe the journey this story represents not to mention that crime mystery theme along with some more important issues that these books are not afraid to tackle; as much as this sounds heavy, it’s a fun read. Throughout Engela’s writing style naturally flows and is fun to read. Revenge is a dish best served cold, you could even say as cold as ‘Winter’ but that’s only something ‘I heard through the grape vine…’ 

5 Stars

The Good Kill: A Killian Lebon Novel by Kurt Brindley – Review

An enthralling, gripping tale of epic proportions taking the reader on a ride full of twists, turns and action…

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Kurt Brindley has constructed an intricate  story that immediately immerses readers into the brutal world of organised crime,  drug and sex trafficking and a gangster underworld all of which is centered around main character Killian Lebon. This warrior and former navy seal embarks on a journey in search of answers and revenge while also dealing with a huge level of trauma. He’s a character that for all of his flaws and even dark moments you cannot help but admire and get behind.

The story unfolds gradually via a gripping and very readable style with the emphasis on Brindley’s descriptive full sentences (proper sentences, how I have longed for thee…)  with a series of stories and characters that all eventually find themselves linked later on. There are a wealth of three dimensional realistic characters with many who have their own flaws much like Killian such as ‘RJ’ with her own traumatic history or ‘Toni’ who is trying to do right even though her surroundings are wrong.

As a reader you definitely get value for money as The Good Kill is long read but it needs to be for the type of story it is and takes some time to get through although not once did I feel as if the story dragged and for a read of this caliber that is indeed an incredible feat.

It’s modern Jason Bourne meets Taken but it feels fresher with a grittier story that is brutal, dark and sometimes violent and always entertaining. There’s revenge and redemption as well as a series of revelations that appear in many different pinnacle moments during the story which is split into 4 parts all of which culminate dramatically.

The Good Kill represents independently published books in the finest possible way.

5 Stars – Great read,  Reviews left on Amazon UK and Goodreads 

The Four Before Me by E. H. Night – Review

‘While some monsters are born, others are created..’

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Upon picking up this book I was instantly immersed into the words and descriptive style E.H Night brings to what is a chilling and mystery shrouded story. By the 8th chapter I’ll admit I couldn’t put it down. 

The Four Before Me leans a little towards cliche but it works in an original way that keeps readers guessing throughout. It’s the late 80’s and Alice our main character; moves to small town ‘Wintersburg’ in search of a new start from the big city and to perhaps be closer to her now deceased Grandmother’s roots. Soon after her arrival she learns that four women are currently missing and that’s when the chilling coincidences begin. I say coincidence but that’s only if you believe in such things and for Alice this starts to play on her mind which in turn becomes psychological – the true strength of this story. She cannot help but think of the many similarities she and the missing women have, in particular ‘Sarah’ who was in fact the previous tenant in Alice’s new place.

As the story unfolds we meet a cast of three dimensional characters all of which serve purpose and depth to the story such as likable law enforcement officer ‘Blake Darrow’ and neighbor ‘Tiffany’ which Alice befriends. Of course there are the less savory characters such as ‘Benji’ or the town renowned ‘Wonderbread Will’. Can they be trusted when so many people are missing in this small town?

There were some instances that my mind was blown by the amount of twists and turns this story had. With elements of crime, mystery, suspense and even some chilling horror you could compare this book with the early works of Stephen King although the voice in this story is fresh and new. Whether it’s the sights or smells, emotions or feelings, this book captures everything including a little nostalgia.

5 Stars

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Good Audit by C.P Aiden – Review

Enjoyable, clever and original

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C.P Aiden has put together a story that on the surface appears to be about the trials of auditing and finance but in fact it’s about everything else that comes with the territory. This book is so well written and concise you could argue it’s use as a teaching aid for the profession and I mean that in the highest regard even though I am layman to all things finance I found myself able to follow and enjoy everything that was happening.

It reads and flows like a series of case studies that follow a team as they journey in putting together a financial audit for a company (Widget Maker) with some fun and sometimes absurd moments. The characters are stripped down to their job titles as names; an original concept that pays off and even makes it easier to follow. – of course this choice may be to protect anyone they are based upon giving the book a sense of possible reality.

The ‘everything else’ concept of this story is probably what makes it such an enjoyable read from discussing lunch drinks policies to office sleeping arrangements or being given the gift of finishing early at 7:30pm with a $25 dinner allowance for two . This is without mentioning ‘the fortuitous leak in the audit cave’ after someone eats day old sushi or even finding out how much others earn. All of these goings on convey the pressure and treatment the employees face when putting together an audit.

The Good Audit is a unique account (no pun intended) written in an original accessible way that I guarantee any reader will enjoy.

5 Stars – it really is as good as C.P Aiden says on twitter!