The Hateful Eight: A review

Quentin Tarantino is back for another western in his 8th feature film. This one was a double dog damned roller coaster of a dialogue fuelled hootin tootin masterclass.

Samuel L Jackson, Kurt Russell and Jenifer Jason Leigh lead a cast of Tarantino familiars and new comers to the post civil war backdrop where a blizzard is on the way. Without giving that much of the main plot line away as it is well worth the three hours of investment in running time and this is a story of the time it is set. Double crossing and mistrust were two of the main themes running strong throughout the movie which throws some unlikely allies or enemies together in a remote shack during a violent blizzard.

Racism is of course a strong theme as Jackson holds his character firm whilst being the only African-American of the main cast. After all this is a time where racial awareness pretty much didn’t exist and the times were constantly changing.

KurtRussell’s character nicknamed the ‘hangman’ is bringing his bounty to the town of Red Rock and has kept her (Jenifer Jason Leigh) alive until their arrival at their shelter from the blizzard. Jackson is also bringing his bounty to town and has aligned himself with Russell. Upon entering the shack they are met by some diverse characters whom are also seeking shelter. Hence a psychological battle ensues between bounty hunters and shady figures ending in true Tarantino style.

There were true moments of laugh out loud comedy particular my from Jackson and a mention should go to the apparent new sheriff of red rock Walton Goggins. The tension between the characters resonated throughout the sharp and witty dialogue which is exactly what this film is pure dialogue. If your expecting masses of action you will be disappointed but this is a masterclass in all of the themes I have mentioned. Yes it’s violent and gory. Scenes aren’t necessarily in order and people aren’t who they seem but that’s the wonder and premise of a Tarantino film.

From the visuals you do see early on are beautiful wide shots of snowy mountains and western country. Something which only can be appreciated on the big screen. After all the writer director makes films exactly for that. Although most of the film took place within the confines of the wooden habidashary the performances were larger than life and some mentions should go forth to Tim Roth and Michael Madsen who added so much more value to this ensemble performance. I would even say this film could be adapted for the stage.

I recommend it highly and rate this film at 9/10

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